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Rye IPA batch #3 planning

My rye IPA has been documented here in my blog plenty. It’s clearly my favorite homebrew result. I made some tweaks in batch #2 (slightly different hop additions, a bit more rye), and now for batch #3, some more hop tweaks.

Batch #1 hops
Variety    Alpha    Amount    IBU    Form    When
German Northern Brewer     10.3 %     21 g     32.3     Loose Pellet Hops     60 Min From End
German Northern Brewer     10.3 %     7 g     6.0     Loose Pellet Hops     30 Min From End
US Amarillo     10.3 %     28 g     14.6     Loose Pellet Hops     20 Min From End
US Amarillo     10.3 %     28 g     9.4     Loose Pellet Hops     10 Min From End
US Amarillo     10.3 %     28 g     7.3     Loose Pellet Hops     1 Min From End
US Amarillo     10.3 %     56 g     0.0     Loose Pellet Hops     Dry-Hopped

batch  #2 hopsVariety    Alpha    Amount    IBU    Form    When
US Chinook     11.8 %     26 g     45.5     Loose Pellet Hops     60 Min From End
US Columbus(Tomahawk)     14.4 %     14 g     10.2     Loose Pellet Hops     20 Min From End
US Amarillo     9.3 %     28 g     10.3     Loose Pellet Hops     15 Min From End
US Amarillo     9.3 %     28 g     8.4     Loose Pellet Hops     10 Min From End
US Columbus(Tomahawk)     14.4 %     14 g     5.5     Loose Pellet Hops     5 Min From End
US Amarillo     9.3 %     28 g     0.0     Loose Pellet Hops     Dry-Hopped
US Columbus(Tomahawk)     14.4 %     14 g     0.0     Loose Pellet Hops     Dry-Hopped

#1 was a bit more dry than #2, with a finishing gravity (FG) of 1.012 vs #2’s 1.014 (likely due to a bit more grain and higher mash temp)

For #3, I expect to aim for a similar FG as batch #2, with similar grain bill. The change this time will be strictly with hops. I am going to use a high alpha hop, Magnum, for the 60 minute bittering addition. In theory, a 60 minute hop offers no noticeable hop flavor or aroma, just bittering. This is why quite often Magnum,  known as a very clean bittering hop, is used for 60 minute additions. Lots of apha acids. The more alpah, the more bittering. You need much less of hop at bittering if it’s something like Magnum (13% alpha) versus, say, Cascade, which is at about 5% alpha. Better to save the hops with desired hop flavor and aroma for the late additions, where they offer little bittering regardless of their alpha. Also, I’m leaving out the Columbus this time, and trying Simcoe instead. Still using LOTS of Amarillo, as I think that’s the hop that makes this beer. Simcoe should work well alongside the Amarillo, offering some tropical fruit but mostly pine flavors and aromas, and with less astringency than some other “piney” hops. Simcoe can be a love or hate hop… and sometimes moreso depending on the yeaa it was grown/harvested. It should match very well with the Amarillo.

While I have both northern brewer and chinook hops in the freezer, I am thinking about saving those more for late addition uses and not for bittering (notice I bittered with these in the first two batches), as they do offer great flavor/aroma. Plus, I have a bunch of Magnum that is really only used for bittering… so best to make use of it.

Get to know your hops on Food Republic

So, I have all my ingredients except for the rye malt, which thankfully just came in to my local homebrew shop. Now I just need to find the time to brew it!

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